Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Save the Date : AAUW Home Tour "Jackson Rediscovered" - April 20, 2013

Home Tour
Sponsored by the Amador Chapter of AAUW

Jackson Rediscovered
Saturday, April 20, 2013
 
Visit some of Jackson’s Historic homes,
the recently restored National Hotel,
and the Kennedy Mine Office.
More information to come later.

Monday, October 29, 2012

CAL FIRE: Burn Restrictions Lifted in AEU

Camino - On Tuesday October 23rd, at 8 am, the Amador-El Dorado Unit (AEU) of CAL FIRE will rescind the burn restrictions due to the current and expected weather pattern which will allow homeowners to properly burn their debris piles that have accumulated over the summer.  Unit Chief Kelly Keenan cautions “if the weather does a 180° turn and it heats up and dries out the vegetation, we could end up suspending burn permits again.”

Door-yard burn permits, aka Residential Landscape Debris burn permits (LE-62A’s), will still be required until the end of fire season has been declared but burn permits can be obtained for FREE at most of your local fire stations.  Daily the Amador-El Dorado Unit of CAL FIRE will determine “burn/no burn day status”, so please make sure you call the burn information line immediately prior to burning.

Amador County (209)223-6246    §  El Dorado County (530)621-5897   Sacramento County (916) 874-4800   §  Alpine County (760) 872-8211

Safety Tips for Burning:
  • Make sure your pile(s) are no larger than four feet by four feet in size,
  • Scrape a ten foot wide ring around each debris pile down to bare dirt,
  • Have a shovel and water supply (charged hose) close by to use in the event your fire escapes from the pile,
  • Make sure an adult is in attendance until the pile is completely extinguished.
For additional information on burning safely, defensible space and other fire and life safety topics, please visit the CAL FIRE website at www.fire.ca.gov.  Thank you.

University of CA to host Forest Landowner Workshops: Learn how to pass on your “Ties to the Land” to the next generation - In Jackson Nov 13

South Lake Tahoe, CA, October 25th, 2012: The University of California is hosting a two-part workshop series on succession planning to help forest landowners learn simple techniques to pass their land and its legacy on to the next generation. The first workshop is being offered at 7 locationsthroughout California. In the central Sierra Nevada, workshops will be held in Auburn on October 30th, Jackson on November 13th, and Sacramento on November 15th. All workshops will be held from 6 to 8 PM.

During this first workshop, participants will learn the steps needed to plan for passing land along to their heirs. An important first step in this process is clarifying the current owners’ goals and values for their family forest or ranch. This allows landowners to start the discussion with heirs about their long term vision for the property. Participants will also learn about the financial impacts of ownership transfers across generations. This first round of identical workshops is being held before the holidays, to allow time for families to get together during the winter holidays and discuss their goals.

The second workshop will be held after the holidays and will cover the financial and legal approaches and  tools such as trusts, limited liability companies, and easements used in succession planning as well as specific planning approaches used to manage land and resources. Dates and times of the second workshop will be announced later.

The workshops will use a curriculum developed by Oregon State University called “Ties to the Land”. The goal of the workshops to help empower forest landowners to pass on both their land and their vision and passion for it to the next generation.

Registration for the workshop is $25 per family to cover costs of the family workbook and DVD. Multiple members of each family are encouraged to attend both workshops. If family members do not live in the same location, they are encouraged to attend the workshop lcoation nearest to them as the curriculum will be the same at each location.

For information on registration, locations of the central Sierra workshops or the entire workshop series, please see the University of California Forest Research and Outreach website http://ucanr.edu/tiestotheland/ or contact Susie Kocher at 530-542-2571 or sdkocher@ucanr.edu.

Haunted Dungeon - Wed Oct 31

Haunted Dungeon - Wed Oct 31 from 6-9PM
Sutter Creek Auditorium
Go underneath the Sutter Creek Auditorium on a frightful tour, or take the less terrifying tour if your a little squeemish. This Haunted Dungeon is the best in the county!
Proceeds are donated to local charities.

Thursday, October 11, 2012

Jazz and swing dancing comes to Volcano - Sat Oct 13

An evening of jazz and swing dancing to the music of the Speakeazy Jazz Orchestra begins at Armory Hall in Volcano, 6 p.m. on October 13. The dance is scheduled to last until 10 p.m.
Dancers will glide to the music of the 1920s and 1930s across the broad, smooth, refinished floor in the town’s renovated hall. Throughout the evening, complementary and tasty hors d’oeuvres will circulate, and a bar will offer champagne cocktails, wine, beer and sodas.
The Speakeazy Jazz Orchestra is an 11-piece dance orchestra in the style of famous 1920’s hotel bands. It was formed in 2008 and features some of the area’s top local and professional musicians. Organizing the band are Steve and Jeff Chambers who are both former members of world famous Royal Society Jazz Orchestra .

Tickets are $15 per person and $25 for couples; youth ages 17 to 10 are $10, and children under 10 are admitted free. A complementary libation at the bar is offered with each ticket purchased.

This is the second in a series of concerts and dances planned for Armory Hall in Volcano. They are scheduled every other month and are held by the Volcano Community Association as benefit concerts for the town’s Scholarship Fund.

For more than 10 years, Volcano high school graduates who continue their education at an accredited university, college or trade school or in military service, have been presented an equal portion of the Scholarship Fund at the town’s summer pot luck.

Dances at Armory Hall are a renewed tradition that goes back to the early years of the 20th century. Folks, young and old, would gather at the hall for dances every month, enjoy a supper at midnight, then dance again until the sun came up. The current program ends at a more reasonable hour.

Tickets are available at the door and advance tickets are available at the Amador County Chamber of Commerce on Main St. in Jackson and at The Country Store in Volcano.
For particular information, telephone 209-296-1569 or 209-296-8002. Information about the concert program can also be reviewed on Facebook: Volcano Armory Hall.


Central Sierra 4-H Celebrates National 4-H Week October 7-13

October 7-13 is National 4-H Week, and Central Sierra 4-H is celebrating the 4-H youth who have made an impact on the community, and are stepping up to the challenges of a complex and changing world.

To celebrate National 4-H Week, 4-Hers across the region are wearing the 4-H shirts to school, visiting
with their Board of Supervisors, and helping out in their communities.

I am a 4-H volunteer because of “My interest in youth becoming future leaders and as a role model for my
own children during their 4-H years; To show how we should care about our community and give back
what we can to our communities.” said El Dorado County 4-H Volunteer Lorraine Larsen-Hallock.
Recent findings from Tufts University's 4-H Study of Positive Youth Development indicate that young
people in 4-H are three times more likely to contribute to their communities than youth not participating in
4-H. Notably, the Tufts research discovered that the structured learning, encouragement and adult
mentoring that 4-H'ers receive play a vital role in helping them actively contribute to their communities. In
El Dorado, Amador, Calaveras, and Tuolumne Counties, more than 1,000 4-H members and 150
volunteers are involved in 4-H.

Also during National 4-H Week, hundreds of thousands of youth from all around the nation will complete a
single, innovative experiment on 4-H National Youth Science Day. The 2012 National Science
Experiment, 4-H Eco-Bot Challenge, explores how robots can be used to preserve and protect the
environment, while offering a glimpse into the future of science, technology, engineering and math. El
Dorado County 4-H held their event last Saturday on October 8th and was attended by over 60 youth.
4-H youth are a living breathing, culture-changing revolution for doing the right thing, breaking through
obstacles and pushing our country forward by making a measurable difference right where they live.

Learn how you can Join the Revolution of Responsibility at 4-H.org/revolution, or contact your local 4-H
Program Representative at University of California Cooperative Extension, Central Sierra at
http://ucanr.edu/centralsierra4-h.

Contact:
Jennifer Goerlitz
Amador County 4-H
(209) 223-6484

Saturday, October 6, 2012

Farms of Amador Dinner: "Permaculture Techniques for Improving Production in Gardens and Small Farms"- Thurs Oct. 25


Please join us in Amador City for a fun and informative evening on Thursday, October 25th.  Farms of Amador's 2012 Fall event will feature a dynamic speaker, excellent food, good company and lively ambiance.  This year's speaker will be Tom Wade, a farmer and storyteller from Nevada Co who uses Permaculture techniques to make the most of his own farm and to help others plan for improving production on their farms.

The cost for the event is just $10 which includes dinner, or $5 if you bring a dish to share.  Last year's event was a huge success, we filled the community hall to bursting and all those in attendance had a wonderful time, so if you can please RSVP we would appreciate it.

Who: Tom Wade a renowned storyteller, farmer and permaculture designer will share his knowledge with all those interested in having a great time while learning how to maximize production on their farm, ranch or
garden.
What: Local Food Dinner at 5:30p.m., Informative and Entertaining Speaker at 7:00 p.m.
When: Thursday, October 25th starting at 5:30 p.m.
Where: Amador City Community Hall, 14531 East School Street Amador City, CA 95601
Why: Because we could all use a community gathering and more information about how to make our farms and gardens more productive.

Cost: $10 per person or $5 if your bring a dish to share.


Tickets can be purchased on-line at:

http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/283371

or for questions or RSVP please contact
info@farmsofamador.com or (209) 402-7801

Please bring your own place setting in an effort to reduce waste.

See you on the evening of October 25th for Farms of Amador's 2012 Fall
Event featuring a presentation by Tom Wade on Permaculture Techniques for Improving Production in Gardens and Small Farms

Wednesday, October 3, 2012

Bakersfield Man Wins $85,364.08 at Jackson Rancheria

JACKSON, CA – George Zaninovich of Bakersfield started October off with a bang, winning $85,364.08 while playing on a progressive slot machine at Jackson Rancheria Casino Resort. George won his jackpot on a dollar Double Diamond 3X 4X 5X Progressive machine on Monday, October 1.



He is among several big winners at the Casino, including two $100,000 winners, since the majority of the resort’s renovations have been completed. “We are pleased to add George to our list of big winners,” said CEO Rich Hoffman.

“Our players are enjoying the newly renovated casino, including new restaurants, a luxurious High Limit Room, wider aisles, new games, and of course big jackpots like this one. And we’re all looking forward to our Grand Opening starting November 1.”

Jackson Rancheria Casino Resort is located at 12222 New York Ranch Road, Jackson, CA 95642. For more information, call 800-822-9466 or visit JacksonCasino.com. Located in the Sierra foothills town of Jackson, CA, Jackson Rancheria Casino Resort is owned by the Jackson Rancheria Band of Miwuk Indians, a federally recognized Indian tribe. A sovereign government, the Rancheria is dedicated to developing projects that not only enhance the tribe’s ability to remain self-reliant, but also reflect a commitment to be a good neighbor.###